", How it's used: "Oh, mate, when was the last time you cleaned your car? The Welsh flag, What it is, right… To judge by popular culture alone—Gavin & Stacey, I am looking at you—the Welsh are presented as a largely cheery nation, fond of the rugby and the ale, with a few linguistic peculiarities that are all charm and whimsy, like “Whose boots are those shoes?” “Now in a minute” and “What are you up to now then later?” Something for everyone interested in hair, makeup, style, and body positivity. How it's used: "Wait, are you talking about Dai Post or Dai Death? Reporting on what you care about. As a Welsh person of under 60, I’m used to periodic rugby glory, but in football have never seen anything remotely to rival my country’s heart-swelling achievements at Euro 2016. How it's used: "Go fetch some carrier bags, they're in the cwtch dan star. Home is where the snow falls. Colophon. - Stereotypical Welsh phrase origins. A collection of Welsh Plaques and Hanging Signs. Was in Carmathennshire this weekend and was amused to hear to coming up. A Google search brings up a few examples of it in use, but no explanation of its origins. “Yay!” the people shouted as he walked past. Covid 19 Update - we're now aiming to ship orders as normal. Search Log in Cart. Self care and ideas to help you live a healthier, happier life. ", How it's used: "Ych a fi, someone's left all their rubbish on the table.". This is a lovely item and I’m very pleased with it. Submit. It was a proper tidy result.". BuzzFeed Staff. Hen Wlad fy Nhadau - Land of My Fathers (Welsh national anthem) Essentials. How it's used: "He's twp in the head, that one is. Any idea where this originally came from? - Stereotypical Welsh phrase origins. Hic is also Latin for this. One for the UK (and more specifically Welsh) contingent. It’s a cold world out there. - Stereotypical Welsh phrase origins. How it's used: "What a night, I'm absolutely hanging this morning though. Close search. I grow in snow. Discover unique things to do, places to eat, and sights to see in the best destinations around the world with Bring Me! The variant “Whose boots are these shoes?” has also been encountered. ", How it's used: "You should see the new I.T. One for the UK (and more specifically Welsh) contingent. by Jamie Jones. Any idea where this originally came from? My vote of for a stereotypical Welsh expression would be, if you ask for directions, you get, “Well, you go BY HERE” (points) " until you come to a phonebox and BY THERE you go right…". When he arrived at his workplace, he walked into his boss’s office wearing a green coat. He felt better because he had made them feel better. ", How it's used: "Alright butt, how's your family keeping?". Derwyn Jones at 50 - the Welsh rugby giant who became the agent to the stars Wales Rugby Team He was the 6ft 10in giant who was one of Welsh rugby's most … Anyone else familiar with this phrase, usually used by English people, in a bad Welsh accent, as a stereotypically Welsh thing to say? Home for the holidays. When the people saw his blue coat and said “yuck,” Bob dashed into a clothing store and bought a green coat. 17 Things Only Welsh People Say "Whose coat is that jacket?" By the middle ages the “i” had become a ‘j’, hence hic jacet. We hold major institutions accountable and expose wrongdoing. Spread cheer with our Best of Welsh Design Award-Winning greeting cards, inspired by Taffywood.com. [Archive] "Whose coat is this jacket?" Search, watch, and cook every single Tasty recipe and video ever - all in one place! 22 Welsh sentences that will confuse everyone else in the world. Give Love, Give Hope, Give Kids, New Coats. PDA. ", What it means: Used in place of 'That's nice. ', How it's used: "I hear Eleri has a new job, there's lovely. And surely the fact that it crops up on more than a dozen web pages means that it has some kind of common currency? A Welsh speaker might give you several versions of a word, just to avoid confusion – for example: ‘Whose coat is that jacket?’ Welsh. What it means: Feeling terrible – usually after a night of drinking. Chris Says: August 1, 2011 at 12:33 pm | Reply. - Wales forever! ).If anything it is thought of far more fondly than the usual 'sheep shagger' accusations gratuitiously flung their way. Anyone else familiar with this phrase, usually used by English people, in a bad Welsh accent, as a stereotypically Welsh thing to say? What I meant was that when I have heard it used, it has usually been by English people imitating Welsh people, rather than by Welsh people themselves. A Google search brings up a few examples of it in use, but no explanation of its origins. The Welsh flag, What it is, right… To judge by popular culture alone—Gavin & Stacey, I am looking at you—the Welsh are presented as a largely cheery nation, fond of the rugby and the ale, with a few linguistic peculiarities that are all charm and whimsy, like “Whose boots are those shoes?” “Now in a minute” and “What are you up to now then later?” Cymru - Wales; Cymry - Welsh (people) Cymraeg - Welsh (language) Cymru am byth! ", How it's used: "You should have seen this man at the gym, he was seriously tamping.". What it means: Randomly used in a sentence for emphasis. He put it on over his blue coat and walked back out in the street. Hug a snowman. “Yuck!” said his bo But to really show someone you care, switch to the Welsh language and give someone a 'cwtch' – meaning the best hug you’ve ever had. How it's used: "Did you catch the game on the weekend? (Image: www.pug306.net) Translation: He is a man of sound farming stock, who is fond of check shirts and drives a … To digress, in Ireland you would of course get the answer, “Well, I wouldn’t start from here!”. A famous Welsh-ism, with no identifiable source but readily associated with the Welsh stereotype.Even the Welsh seem to readily acknowledge it and can be heard to jokingly state it in the most exaggerated accent (think 'oh boyo, how green was my valley? A collection of Welsh Plaques and Hanging Signs. Ice Magic Improve your skills, whatever you drive. Ice And Snow… Take It Slow. Be sure to have a look at our Old Welsh Proverbs for perfect examples of the wicked Welsh humour. What it means: Cupboard under the stairs. View Full Version : "Whose coat is this jacket?" But to really show someone you care, switch to the Welsh language and give someone a 'cwtch' – meaning the best hug you’ve ever had. Second nature to the Welsh - meaningless to everyone else. “See those two houses on the hill? ", How it's used: "Mae'n ddrwg gen i dweud bod yr trên nesaf wedi cael ei ohirio.". Keep Out the Cold. Skip to content. Useful Welsh Sayings / Phrases / Words. Wales. What it means: A term of friendly address. Ice ice baby. guy, he's proper lush.". What it means: Something, someone or a situation that's good. Mine’s the one in the middle.”, Powered by Discourse, best viewed with JavaScript enabled, "Whose coat is this jacket?" ” or ‘Whose coat is this jacet (iacet). Well, I’m an Englishman who may years ago spent three years in Cardiff (OK not hardcore Wales but whatever) and I have never even heard of either phrase let alone to the extent it is “usually used” or “stereotypical”! The chef whose £2,000-a-time cakes have earned her a fortune. Well, I didn’t really mean to imply that it was especially common. ", How it's used: "He's a chopsy boy, that one.". I thought it was because Jackett was a popular Welsh name? Obsessed with travel? If you are based in the UK, sign up to our newsletter for opportunities to study and work abroad. How it's used: "Come on, mun, let's at least have another pint. Submit. - Stereotypical Welsh phrase origins General Questions ... Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions > "Whose coat is this jacket?" Jet black is a respected style staple, and these fashion quotes about the color black prove it’s as beloved in the world of high fashion as it is in terms of daily dressing and street style. It stands up well on its own but also has two hooks on the back if you want to hang it. California residents can opt out of "sales" of personal data. Here are some helpful Welsh phrases to get you started. Hence “Whose coat is this lying here. I just love a good blizzard. Healthy throats have warm coats. 1. How it's used: "You look quite ill, are you alright, bach? Now there is an English stereotype! "Twp" Tap to play or pause GIF S4C / BuzzFeed What it means: Not very clever. Frame 'em, send 'em, love 'em... We present for your consideration 30 fabulous A6-size blank greeting/note cards whose homage to classic book design and ridiculous Welshified titles are sure to lighten the mood of lucky recipients ...provided you can bear to give them away. What it means: Used to differentiate between all the people named Dai. A Welsh speaker might give you several versions of a word, just to avoid confusion – for example: ‘Whose coat is that jacket?’ Welsh. The variant “Whose boots are these shoes?” has also been encountered. Keep up with the latest daily buzz with the BuzzFeed Daily newsletter! It's buzzing back here.